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Lopsided Expectations

Pick up any journal or business magazine or paper today; we will find at least few pieces on the expectations from managers. They clamour, “In times of quiet quitting, great resignations, a manager must   Energize and inspireContinuously develop, show career optionsAssign roles that will motivate employees to contributeBe empathetic, care for wellbeingEncourage flexible working … Continue reading Lopsided Expectations

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Incessant Stories We Tell

Every waking moment of our lives, we involuntarily weave stories; stories about people around us, about our context, problems / challenges and even stories about ourselves. Stories are powerful, they influence our behaviors, actions and decisions. This in turn impacts our reality. When we tell ourselves a positive story, our actions are affirmative and energizing, … Continue reading Incessant Stories We Tell

‘Not to Judge’ – a difficult leadership lesson

We come across several situations in our lives – both personal and professional – when we tend to judge others’ actions as ‘right or wrong’, ‘acceptable or unacceptable’, ‘wise or not so wise’……. Let’s take an example: Say, a good assignment providing strong exposure and bright prospects for accelerated career growth has come up. Employees … Continue reading ‘Not to Judge’ – a difficult leadership lesson

Manager who always pushes the envelop

It is difficult to work with a manager who continuously pushes the envelope. However, this behavior enables his / her team members to learn, experiment, and do the very best, even surpassing their own expectations. They truly unleash the hidden potential. Agreed, working with such managers is not easy, can be truly frustrating… how about calling it the ‘cost of learning’, the ‘cost of becoming a better professional’ Maybe, it’s worth all the associated pain!

Making constructive feedback enjoyable 

Sharing constructive feedback is not something many people look forward to. What makes this conversation especially difficult is the difference in perspective: the person giving the feedback is likely to have a very different perspective from the person receiving it. It is hard for either member to know other’s perspective, and even harder to appreciate and acknowledge it. Four steps that can make this conversation inspiring 1. Start with intent 2. Understand the current reality faced by the receiver, share your feedback 3. Agree on common outcomes. 4. Explore options