Learning to Learn 

Internet has truly democratized information. In today’s world of information overload, what differentiates individuals, teams and organizations is the ability to learn, the willingness to learn to learn. Four interconnected aspects that make a difference are: • Am I CURIOUS to understand things that I don’t know, or never knew existed? • Do I OBSERVE others in action, be leaders or co-workers (or even children, family, friends)? • How do I APPLY it to my context –what works, doesn’t work, why so? • Do I have the courage to engage in honest SELF-REFLECTION?

Making constructive feedback enjoyable 

Sharing constructive feedback is not something many people look forward to. What makes this conversation especially difficult is the difference in perspective: the person giving the feedback is likely to have a very different perspective from the person receiving it. It is hard for either member to know other’s perspective, and even harder to appreciate and acknowledge it. Four steps that can make this conversation inspiring 1. Start with intent 2. Understand the current reality faced by the receiver, share your feedback 3. Agree on common outcomes. 4. Explore options

The Onerous Road to Collaboration

We continuously compete and collaborate with the same people. At work, we collaborate with people to successfully complete projects, yet compete with them for recognition, critical projects, raises and promotions. While individual skills matter, Team Culture plays a big role in facilitating the transition, key elements are common goals, eliminating job hierarchy and recognising contribution to common goals. It's time for leaders to reflect, which actions of mine are nudging the team to lean towards collaboration and which are pushing them towards competition? What should we stop doing? Or continue? Or start?